How to Make Nourishing Bone Broth

November 11, 2019

Bone Broth is a mineral-rich infusion made by boiling bones of animals. It is used for its delicious flavor and many powerful health benefits that you can easily add to your family’s diet.

Broth is a traditional food that your grandmother or great grandmother likely made often. Many societies around the world still consume broth regularly as it is a cheap and highly nutrient dense food.

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Broth is an excellent source of minerals and is known to boost the immune system and improve digestion. Learn about the powerful health benefits of Bone Broth here.

It can be made from the bones of beef, bison, lamb, poultry, or fish. Vegetables and spices are often added both for flavor and added
nutrients.

Homemade, nutrient-dense bone broth is incredibly easy and inexpensive to make. There is no comparison to the store-bought versions which often contain chemicals and lack gelatin and some of the other health-boosting properties of homemade broth.

In selecting the bones for broth, look for high quality bones from grass-fed and pasture raised animals. Since you’ll be extracting the minerals and drinking them in concentrated form, you want to make sure that the animal was as healthy as possible.

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We have a variety of options for making bone broth: Beef Soup Bones, Beef Soup Bones Bulk Bundle, Ox Tail2 Chicken Feet & NeckChicken Feet & Neck Bulk Bundle, and you can use the bones from our Stewing Hens or whole chickens.

Bone Broth Recipe

-->1 to 2 pounds (or more) of bones from pasture raised chicken or grass-fed and grass-finished beef. 

-->2 chicken feet and 1 neck for extra gelatin (optional)

-->1 onion, 2-4 cloves of garlic, whatever veggies you have on hand roughly chopped- I usually use a couple carrots.

-->2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (to break down proteins for better solubility)

-->Optional: 1 bunch of parsley, 1 tablespoon or more of sea salt, 1 teaspoon peppercorns, additional herbs or spices to taste.

You'll need a large stock pot, slow cooker, or Instant Pot to cook the broth in and a strainer to remove the pieces when it is done.

Instructions for Stock Pot or Slow Cooker

-->When using beef bones, roast them in the oven at 350-400  degrees for 45 min-1 hr or until brown to enhance the flavor. Skip this step if using chicken bones.

-->Place the bones in a large stock pot (I use a 5 gallon pot) or a slow cooker.

-->Pour water over the bones and add the vinegar. The acid helps make the nutrients in the bones more available.

-->Rough chop and add the vegetables to the pot and add any salt, pepper, spices, or herbs, if using.

-->Now, bring the broth to a boil. Once it has reached a vigorous boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer for 24 hours for chicken bones or 24 to 48 hours when using beef bones. When I'm using my slow cooker I start it off on high and reduce to low heat once it starts to boil.

-->Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Strain using a fine metal strainer to remove all the bits of bone and vegetable.

-->When cool enough, store in a gallon size glass jar in the fridge for up to 5 days, or freeze for later use.

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Instructions for the Instant Pot (electric pressure cooker):

-->Place the bones in the Instant Pot and add the apple cider vinegar. The acid helps make the nutrients in the bones more available.

-->Pour water over the bones to 1-inch below the fill line. 

-->Rough chop and add the vegetables to the pot. Add any salt, pepper, spices, or herbs, if using. Set the Instant Pot to high pressure for 120 minutes. Once the 2 hours is up, let the pressure release naturally (takes about 15 minutes). 

-->Strain using a fine metal strainer to remove all the bits of bone and vegetable.

-->When cool enough, store in a gallon size glass jar in the fridge for up to 5 days, or freeze for later use.

How do you use your bone broth? Let's share our favourite recipes in the comments below :)

Angela Bakker

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